And a cold start to 2017

Sunday 1st January – Saturday 7th January 2017

The cold spell has been continuing into the new year, although we had some rather welcome sunshine on Monday 2nd January. To celebrate Max and I went for a walk on Upton Heath as usual on a Monday.

New Year - Same old pond

Near the pond we met the 3 Weimeraners, including Hazel who had one of her usual ‘small’ sticks. Here she is having a good old chew at it.

Hazel's found herself a stick

We walked on round the lower heath and when we got to the Roman Road Max got in the stream as usual. The light on his was lovely.

Max in the stream

And lastly for today, here is a shot of the Roman Road where the stream crosses it.

The Roman Road in winter

On Tuesday it was a cold and frosty start, so I chose to take Max out to Kingston Lacy. When we got there Max was a bit worried by the warning sign at the entrance.

The sign has got Max a bit worried

But he needn’t have worried as the paths weren’t slippery at all. The grounds were looking lovely in the frost and sunlight though.

A clear, frost morning

This photo was taken along the Cedar Avenue.

Sun throught the cedars

As was this one of a frosted bench.

Frosted seat

These frosty leaves also caught my eye.

Frosty leaves

It was only towards the end of our walk that we began to see many other people. This couple passed us as we walked through the gardens, though.

Waling through the gardens

We walked on round to the Japanese garden, which looked nice in the frost and sun.

The Japanese Garden

And I rather liked the light and shade around this little ornament.

Stone ornament

After that we continued on through the woodland walk and finally back to the car.

Wednesday I went to see my Dad as usual and on Thursday we once again had a heavy frost so I decided to take Max down to Lychett Bay. The tide was out and the shoreline was rather icy.

An icy Lychett Bay at low tide

Max was not happy as he couldn’t get anywhere near the water.

Max is not happy that the tide is out

We walked on round to the small beach at Turlin Moor, where the boats looked lovely in the still water.

Reflections on a cold morning

Round here the seaweed on the beach was frozen.

Frozen seaweed

As was the fishing gear left in the boats.

Fishing nets and float Frosted float

There was also frost over this discarded bag left on the beach.

Discarded

Max finally managed to get down to the water round here, but he also got very muddy paws in the process.

Mr Muddy Paws!

After that we headed back to the car but before we left we went to see the new viewing platform that has been built overlooking the bay.

The new viewing platform

And this is the view it gives.

Lychett Bay from the viewing platform

And one last photo from our walk: a frozen seed head.

Frosty seedhead

You may be wondering where Jez was while Max and I were doing all this walking. Well, she was busy snoozing in the sun at home.

Jez snoozing in the sun

And who can blame her?

A year ago

From the same week a year ago I’ve chosen this photo, taken out at Badbury Rings, which is also part of the National Trust Kinston Lacy estate.

Circle of light

Advertisements

Mixed weather at Badbury Rings

Tuesday 5th January 2016

As there was some promise of sunshine this morning I took Max out to Badbury Rings for our walk. The weather wasn’t bad when we got there and we soon made the acquaintance of Golden Retriever, Monty.

We met Monty

As usual we headed up the hill to the north of the rings that leads to the old oak wood.

Blue skies and a muddy path

As you can see we had blue skies. There was some cloud around though, as this shot, looking west towards Hemsworth, shows.

Looking towards Hemsworth

We continued on up the muddy track where we met a walker coming the other way.

We met a walker

After that we skirted round the side of the old oak wood. You can’t walk through it as the trees that fall are left to rot, although I noticed today that the National Trust are clearing it out a bit. Anyway, the path round the wood was somewhat wet and muddy, to say the least.

It was impossible to avoid the mud

We walked on round and then turned south towards the Rings again, walking through King Down Farm and on up the hill. At the top of the hill we turned east into High Wood, which was also very wet in places. I also don’t understand why the National Trust have cleared all of the bracken and brambles in the centre of the wood, as in the summer it is usually home to loads of butterflies. Anyway, as we walked round I took this photo of fungi growing on an old tree stump.

Fungi

And here’s another one, a bit further on, of fungi and moss.

Fungi and moss

At about this time we had a very short shower of rain, which enabled me to take this photo of raindrops on a honeysuckle shoot.

Raindrops on a honeysuckle shoot

We came out of the woods after struggling through the mud, and then turned back towards Badbury Rings. Along the edge of the woods there were lots of hazel catkins.

Hazel Catkins

When we got back to the Rings I was wondering which route to take, and then realised that the skies were black to the south but the sun was starting to shine through, so that decided me. It enabled me to take a whole series of photos of the sun breaking through the clouds. When you see a scene like this you can understand how ancient peoples thought that there god(s) were talking to them from on high.

Circle of light

And here is a panorama of the same scene.

Hole in the sky

How lucky was I?

As we came home via Wimborne I stopped off by the River Stour, which is currently in flood.

The Stour is in flood

And finally for today, in the early afternoon the postman knocked on our door to say a blackbird had flown into our front window and had knocked itself out. It quickly recovered but refused to move.

A blackbird recovers from an encounter with a window

I popped a washing basket over it to protect it from the neighbours’ cats, and then left it to recover. After about half an hour I removed the basket but kept an eye on it, and I’m pleased to say it eventually flew away.

A year ago today

Max and I met the Exmoor ponies on Upton Heath.

Nosy!

A sunny morning at Badbury Rings

Friday 21st February 2014

Bright sunshine this morning meant that Jez was staying put to snooze in the sun, so I took the opportunity to take Max and the camera and go for a proper walk. We went to Badbury Rings, which is just outside Wimborne Minster on the National Trust Kingston Lacy estate. For those of you new to this blog Badbury rings is an Iron Age hillfort. Oh, and this post is for my friend Lindsay, who says she likes my landscape photography. This is mainly about the landscape, as we did a circular walk to the north of the Rings. For that reason there will be mainly photos with little commentary.

But first we have Max on the lower part of the Rings themselves. This was taken as we headed out to the bridleway that runs north to The Oaks (an old oak wood). I should have thought and taken video as overhead was a skylark, singing it’s heart out. Such a beautiful sound.

Max at Badbury Rings

This is a gate leading into The Oaks (although all the gates are locked as you’re not allowed to walk in there – I believe because they leave the old trees to fall and decay so it is not safe).

Gate into The Oaks

A hazel with it’s catkins on the edge of The Oaks.

Hazel with catkins

King Down farm.

King Down Farm

The view across to Lambing Cottage.

View to Lambing Cottage

Tree on the path out to Lambing Cottage (I’m not sure what type).

Tree

The path leading up to King Down.

Path leading west to King Down

Looking north east from King Down. I like this photo. It looks as though it’s been taken with an ultra wide angle lens, but it hasn’t. The effect is caused by a natural dip in the land.

Looking north east from King Down

View towards Old Lawn Farm from King Down.

View towards Old Lawn Farm from King Down

A rider coming past one of the two barrows on King Down. I am assuming these are Bronze Age like the three barrows at Badbury Rings.

Barrow on King Down

Another view of King Down Farm.

King Down Farm

And lastly, Badbury Rings themselves, taken from the east entrance.

Badbury Rings, East entrance

I hope you’ve enjoyed the walk. It was just under 5 miles so not too bad. Chris was beginning to think we’d got lost we took so long though.